THIS BLOG is NOW RETIRED

I began this blog in May 2009 following the death of Marcia Powell at Perryville State Prison in Goodyear, Arizona. It is not intended to prescribe the path that leads to freedom from the prison industrial complex.

Rather, these are just my observations in arguably the most racist, fascist, militaristic state in the nation at a critical time in history for a number of intersecting liberation movements. From Indigenous resistance to genocidal practices, to the fight over laws like SB1070 and the ban on Ethnic Studies, Arizona is at the center of many battles for human rights, and thus the struggle for prison abolition as well - for none are free until all are. I retired the blog in APRIL 2013.

Visit me now at Arizona Prison Watch or Survivors of Prison Violence-AZ

David Rovics: We Are Everywhere

To my fellow activists now struggling through life - let this be a reminder that you are not alone and that we desperately need you here. All the injustice, grief, war, and human suffering calls for us to stay and do everything we can about it - you can't help us anymore when you're gone. Don't give up the fight - your last shred of hope may just keep someone else alive, too.
BLOG POSTS

Thursday, August 26, 2010

Inside Shadows: Memorial for Marilyn Buck, NOV 11.

This comes from the SF Chronicle via Marilyn's friends in the Phoenix Anarchist Coalition. Maybe we should host a memorial here, too.

--------Women Prisoner News: Marilyn Buck obituary in SF Chronicle-------

A memorial gathering will be held on November 7th from 4-7 at the First Unitarian Church, 685 14th St., Oakland. Additional ones will be held in Texas, New York City, and Puerto Rico; details will be posted on www.marilynbuck.com.

On Tuesday, August 3, 2010, long-time U.S.political prisoner and acclaimed poet Marilyn Buck, 62, passed peacefully at her home in Brooklyn. On July 15th, several weeks before the date originally set for her release, Marilyn had been released from the federal Bureau of Prisons medical facility in Carswell, Texas and paroled to New York. Marilyn served 25 years of an 80-year prison sentence for politically motivated actions undertaken in support of self-determination and national liberation and in opposition to racial injustice and U.S. imperialism. Throughout her years in prison, Marilyn remained a steadfast supporter of fellow political prisoners and an advocate for the women with whom she was imprisoned.

Marilyn became involved in the civil rights and anti-war movements and joined the Students for a Democratic Society during her college years and became an active supporter of the Puerto Rican, Native American and Black liberation struggles in this country. She was a consistent and outspoken advocate for the liberation of women and gay liberation.Marilyn was incarcerated in Dublin, California for 15 years, during which time she earned a Bachelor of Arts in psychology and Master of Arts in poetics. Her poetry and essays have been printed in a wide variety of journals and books. A new collection of her poetry will be published next year under the title "Inside Shadows."

In 2009, Marilyn was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer; treatment came too late to save her life. Marilyn is survived by three brothers, three sisters-in-law; cousins, nieces and nephews; her friend and attorney Soffiyah Elijah, and other loving friends worldwide. A memorial gathering will be held on November 7th from 4-7 at the First Unitarian Church, 685 14th St., Oakland. Additional ones will be held in Texas, New York City, and Puerto Rico; details will be posted on www.marilynbuck.com.

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=%2Fc%2Fa%2F2010%2F08%2F22%2FMNBUCKMARI6.DTL

This article appeared on page Z - 99 of the San Francisco Chronicle © 2010 Hearst Communications Inc.

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