THIS BLOG is NOW RETIRED

I began this blog in May 2009 following the death of Marcia Powell at Perryville State Prison in Goodyear, Arizona. It is not intended to prescribe the path that leads to freedom from the prison industrial complex.

Rather, these are just my observations in arguably the most racist, fascist, militaristic state in the nation at a critical time in history for a number of intersecting liberation movements. From Indigenous resistance to genocidal practices, to the fight over laws like SB1070 and the ban on Ethnic Studies, Arizona is at the center of many battles for human rights, and thus the struggle for prison abolition as well - for none are free until all are. I retired the blog in APRIL 2013.

Visit me now at Arizona Prison Watch or Survivors of Prison Violence-AZ

David Rovics: We Are Everywhere

To my fellow activists now struggling through life - let this be a reminder that you are not alone and that we desperately need you here. All the injustice, grief, war, and human suffering calls for us to stay and do everything we can about it - you can't help us anymore when you're gone. Don't give up the fight - your last shred of hope may just keep someone else alive, too.
BLOG POSTS

Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Texas:The Execution of Claude Jones.

From the Innocence Project

Did Texas Execute an Innocent Man?


Claude Jones and his mother

DNA testing is moving forward in the case of Claude Jones, who was executed in 2000 in Texas for a murder he always said he didn’t commit. The Innocence Project has sought DNA testing in the case for years, and this month a Texas judge ordered the state to preserve the evidence so testing can proceed. The tests, on a hair from the crime scene, could prove whether the perpetrator was Jones or another man.(Above: Jones and his mother two years before he was executed.)

A recent feature in Time Magazine explored the Jones case, which could potentially be the first time a person has been proven innocent through DNA after being executed. Prosecutors had sought to dismiss the case and destroy the evidence, but the court decision means it could be tested within 60 days.

"We have said all along that this case is about a search for the truth and the public’s right to know. We are very pleased that the court agrees with this objective," Innocence Project Co-Director Barry Scheck said following the court’s ruling.

Read more about Jones’ case.