THIS BLOG is NOW RETIRED

I began this blog in May 2009 following the death of Marcia Powell at Perryville State Prison in Goodyear, Arizona. It is not intended to prescribe the path that leads to freedom from the prison industrial complex.

Rather, these are just my observations in arguably the most racist, fascist, militaristic state in the nation at a critical time in history for a number of intersecting liberation movements. From Indigenous resistance to genocidal practices, to the fight over laws like SB1070 and the ban on Ethnic Studies, Arizona is at the center of many battles for human rights, and thus the struggle for prison abolition as well - for none are free until all are. I retired the blog in APRIL 2013.

Visit me now at Arizona Prison Watch or Survivors of Prison Violence-AZ

David Rovics: We Are Everywhere

To my fellow activists now struggling through life - let this be a reminder that you are not alone and that we desperately need you here. All the injustice, grief, war, and human suffering calls for us to stay and do everything we can about it - you can't help us anymore when you're gone. Don't give up the fight - your last shred of hope may just keep someone else alive, too.
BLOG POSTS

Sunday, September 13, 2009

Burma Democracy Leader Detained after Editorial


This is a follow up to Win Tin's opinion piece, posted below...
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Washington Post
Saturday, September 12, 2009 

YANGON (Reuters) - Veteran Myanmar opposition leader Win Tin said he was taken in for questioning by police intelligence but released after a few hours late on Saturday with a warning he could be called in again.



The 80-year-old is a founding member of the National League for Democracy (NLD) led by Nobel peace prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi and was the longest-serving political prisoner in army-ruled Myanmar until his release in an amnesty in September last year.



"They said that they wanted to ask me some questions in connection with information they got from some people during interrogation under detention," Win Tin told Reuters, giving no details on the information or the other people.



"They treated me well but all their questions were groundless so I denied them all," he added.

"They said they would send me back home this time for health reasons but might call me in again if necessary."
Win Tin has had heart problems and recently had a pacemaker fitted.


He is a close aide to party leader Suu Kyi, who is under house arrest and has spent 14 of the past 20 years in detention of one form or another.



Win Tin said he was not asked anything about an opinion piece written by him and published in the Washington Post last week, in which he criticized plans being drawn up by the military regime for an election next year in the former Burma.



In the article, Win Tin said "the showcase election planned by the military regime makes a mockery of the freedom sought by our people and would make military dictatorship permanent."



The United States is in the process of reviewing its policy toward Myanmar, although it has said closer ties would depend, among other things, on the release of political prisoners including Suu Kyi.


Win Tin wrote in the article: "Some international observers view next year's planned elections as an opportunity. But under the circumstances imposed by the military's constitution, the election will be a sham."



(Reporting by Aung Hla Tun; Editing by Alan Raybould and Jerry Norton)

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